Summer Semester Courses

Summer Semester at Assumption: Small Classes, Reduced Cost
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Assumption's online and summer day courses provide students the opportunity to complete a semester-long course in six weeks with smaller class sizes at a reduced cost per course. Whether a student seeks to accelerate his/ her degree program, catch up, or simply focus on a particular course, this is an opportunity worth exploring.

The courses offered during the summer are the same versions as their fall or spring semester counterparts, taught by the same professors, and provide the same level of intellectual rigor. As such, no special permission is needed for Assumption students to “count” these courses as part of their curriculum. The only real difference is the summer classes cost less than the fall and spring versions.

SESSION I: May 21 - June 29, 2018
   
COURSE INSTRUCTOR SCHEDULE
Principles of Accounting I Foley Online
Matters and Mysteries of Your Brain Sacino TR 9 - noon
Principles of Macroeconomics Volz Online
Argument and Persuasion Gilbert Online
Children’s Literature Beyers Online
Special Topics: Conquering the Americas Christensen Online
Introduction to Health, Human and Rehabilitation Services Caron Online
Human Development and Disability Across Lifespan Scannell Online
Psychiatric Rehabilitation Randall Online
Introductory Math Kozak M/T/W/TH 9:30 - 11 a.m.
Elementary Functions Shankara & Rao Online
Introduction to Management Lewis Online
Introduction to Organizational Behavior Frakl Online
Principles of Marketing Bailey Online
Marketing Management (WE) Blake Online
Social Media Marketing Daniels Online
Socrates and the Search for Truth Miles TR 9 - noon
Global Pop Clemente Online
General Psychology
Kuersten-Hogan Online
Psychology of Learning Lionello-Denolf Online
Psychology of Dev: Infancy & Childhood Kalpidou Online
Positive Psychology Fitzpatrick Online
Spanish III Leone Online
Faith and Reason Klofft M/W 9 - noon
     
SESSION II: July 2 - August 10, 2018    
     
Principles of Accounting II Coleman Online
Principles of Macroeconomics White Online
Special Topics:  Drugs, Wars, and Borders: US and Latin American Relations Christensen Online
Rehabilitation Strategies and Interventions Lauzon Online
Elementary Functions Kathcher M/W 9 - noon
Calculus I Kozak M/T/W/TR 9:30 - 11 a.m.
Sport Management O'Hara Online
Advertising Drouart Online
Marketing on the Internet Daniels Online
Ethics and the Good Life Gallagher TR 9 - noon.
General Psychology Gordon Online
Abnormal Psychology Volungus Online
Psychology of Adolescence and Maturity Zhang Online
Spanish II Loustaunau Online
Introduction to Theology Monroe M/W 9 to noon
Approaches to Reading and Interpretation Shields Online

 

Summer I (May 21 - June 29, 2018)

ACC 125 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING
I An introduction to accounting concepts for financial reporting. Accounting theories and principles relative to asset valuation, liability reporting, and income determination will be examined. The uses and limitations of external financial reports will be emphasized. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Foley

BIO 115 MATTERS AND MYSTERIES OF YOUR BRAIN
The brain is the most complex and least understood organ in our bodies. It is fascinating to consider that the brain is required for a vast array of functions including learning and memory, motor movement, and perception of our environment. The brain’s vital role in our daily life is indisputable, yet we do not fully understand the fundamental underpinnings of brain function. For this reason, the brain is referred to as the last frontier of science. In this course, student-driven approaches will be used to explore what is known and what is not yet fully understood about brain function through the use of case studies of humans suffering from brain injury, hypothesis-driven experimentation, and critical examination of recent science findings as described by the media. Students will refine their practice of the scientific method while enhancing critical thinking skills. Lab fee: $200 starting in 2018-19. This course fulfills the Core curriculum science requirement for the Class of 2020 and after. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Sacino

ENG 201 ARGUMENT AND PERSUASION
Words matter. Of course, so do images and ideas, which can be expressed linguistically but also stylistically in terms of both the form and the function of a persuasive piece of communication. This course will therefore take up the rhetorical force of words (not to mention images and ideas) by first considering “rhetoric” itself not as a pejorative label but rather as a source of communicative power. Students will engage the uses (and abuses) of words and phrases, categories of language choices, varieties of verbal techniques, figures of argument, and more, all with the learning objective of developing a strong sense of rhetorical style. Emphasis will be on written argument, with some attention to reading, listening, and speaking. Consequently, you will analyze and then produce communications like micro-analysis papers, letters to editors, op-eds, and congressional testimonies. Students will then have the option to create an artful piece of persuasion for a final project in the form of an advertisement, a public service announcement, a podcast episode, or some other mode of public argumentation. Prerequisite: ENG130. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Gilbert

ENG 263 CHILDREN’S LITERATURE
This course provides a general overview of the field of children’s literature. Students read representative classic and contemporary works of children’s literature from a variety of genres, including fairy and folk tales, modern fantasy, realism, and nonfiction. They evaluate text and illustration, as well as address current issues in the field. Further, through disciplined examination of the history and tradition of children’s literature, students develop an appreciation for children’s books and those who create them. Prerequisites: ENG 130 and any Introduction to Literature. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Beyers

HRS 119 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH, HUMAN AND REHABILITATION SERVICES
This course is an introduction to the theory, practice and systems of health, human and rehabilitation services. The information covered in this course is geared toward students in all majors so that they may become more socially, politically, culturally and humanly aware of the issues that people with disabilities, chronic illnesses and challenging life circumstances experience. This course utilizes social justice frameworks to consider the barriers and inequities faced by individuals typically marginalized, disenfranchised and limited from full participation in society. The history, legislation and mission of health, human and rehabilitation services will be examined along with the major models and theories of helping and providing services in community-based health and human service agencies. Current issues and trends in health, human and rehabilitation service provision are covered with specific attention paid to disability and chronic illness. This course fulfills the social science requirement in the Core Curriculum. Three Credits
INSTRUCTOR: Caron

HRS 121 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND DISABILITY ACROSS THE LIFESPAN
This course will cover the basic principles of developmental theories in addition to the major theories of human growth and development. Piaget, Erikson, Bronfenbrenner, Maslow and Kohlberg are some of the theorists studied in this course. Demographic shifts across history are identified with the intent of demonstrating the increased population of individuals living and living longer with chronic illness and disability. Typical development across the lifespan is studied with each stage of life covered from pregnancy and infancy to older adulthood. Disabilities and chronic illnesses common to each stage of life will be studied with discussion of the ways in which the disability and illness experience affects passage through life stages. This course fulfills the social science requirement in the Core Curriculum. Three Credits
INSTRUCTOR: Scannell

HRS 320 PSYCHIATRIC REHABILITATION
As an introduction to psychiatric rehabilitation, this course emphasizes understanding of lifespan development with appreciation for the complex interaction of biological, social and psychological variables that influence human behavior. From this bio-psycho-social framework, the course will review major psychiatric and developmental disorders with attention to diagnostic and intervention strategies. This course will also address the co-occurrence of psychiatric disorders and substance use disorders in individuals. The challenging nature of treatment and rehabilitation for individuals with co-occurring disorders will be identified and covered. Educational and vocational factors will also be covered. Students will gain an understanding and appreciation of the personal experience of psychiatric disability and recovery, including an understanding of the core principles and motives of psychiatric rehabilitation. Prerequisites: HRS 119; HRS 121. Three Credits
INSTRUCTOR: Randall

MAT 111 INTRODUCTORY MATHEMATICS
An introductory course in basic algebra which covers the following topics: properties of real numbers, linear equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, polynomials, fractional algebra, radicals, and rational exponents. Not open to those who have completed any other mathematics course. Three Credits
INSTRUCTOR: Kozak

MAT 114 ELEMENTARY FUNCTIONS
A survey of those topics in algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry which provide the background for the study of calculus. Topics to be covered include exponential and logarithmic functions, complex numbers and polynomial functions, trigonometry, plane analytic geometry, and systems of linear equations and inequalities. Not open to those who have completed MAT 117 or 131. Prerequisite: MAT 111 or departmental permission through placement. Counts in the Core Curriculum Requirements as Mathematics Group A. If only one Mathematics course is taken to fulfill the Core requirement in Mathematics, it must be at this level or higher. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Shankara/ Rao

MGT 100 INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT
This course introduces a systems approach to managing organizations and focuses on the planning, organizing, leading, and controlling tasks and functions of managers. Students are given the opportunity to development key managerial skills such as self-management, team management and organizational management that support effective performance. The course includes an introduction to basic Microsoft Excel, Word, and presentation software for business communication. MGT 100 should not be taken in same semester as MKT 101. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Lewis

MGT 102 INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR
This course focuses on developing an understanding of individual characteristics and interpersonal and organizational processes and how they influence organizational outcomes such as performance, creativity, citizenship behavior, stress, deviance and ethical behavior. Students will have an opportunity to develop their managerial/leadership style through experiential learning. Topics include: personality theory, learning, motivation, power and justice, conflict/negotiation skills, decision making, leadership and team dynamics, communication, and organizational culture. Prerequisite: MGT 100. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Frkal

MKT 101 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING
This introductory course assesses the impact of environmental forces on the practice of marketing. Students will learn the fundamentals of the marketing mix. The course covers the following: target market identification, market research, consumer behavior, product positioning, distribution, communications (personal selling, advertising, sales promotion, and public relations), and pricing decisions. Should not be taken in same semester as MGT 100. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Bailey

MKT 309 MARKETING MANAGEMENT
Relying on real world cases, students will learn to apply marketing concepts. This course will develop the application of specific analytic techniques, the ability to distinguish opinion from fact, and the articulation of decisions that can be defended on economic and practical grounds. Cases will cover a wide range of marketing topics, including target market and segmentation, consumer behavior, product strategy and positioning, pricing, promotion, strategy formulation, and optimum use of the marketing mix. Prerequisites: MKT 101 and Junior/Senior standing. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Blake

MKT 327 SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING
This course will cover one of the fastest growth areas within the marketing discipline—social media marketing. Over the last half dozen years, organizations have shifted more of their marketing expenditures from traditional to digital marketing campaigns. And, within digital marketing, expenditures for campaigns that involve social media tactics have grown exponentially. Although specific social media platforms or channels such as MySpace, Facebook or Twitter may come and go; the underlying principles behind social media of engaging present and potential customers with content that they want to share with others are here to stay. Prerequisite: MKT 101. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Daniels

PHI 100 SOCRATES AND THE SEARCH FOR TRUTH
This course introduces students to the activity of philosophy, understood in the Socratic sense of living an examined life. Philosophy begins by questioning ordinary experience and the opinions one already holds, and it becomes a comprehensive, fundamental, and self-reflective search for the truth about the nature of human beings and the good life, the world, and God. Readings include Plato’s Apology of Socrates and the Allegory of the Cave, as well as at least one medieval and one modern text. This course also introduces elementary principles of logical reasoning and basic distinctions of philosophic importance. It serves as the first half of a core seminar, and each section includes some direct link with the content pursued in each of the intermediate core courses in philosophy. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Miles

MUS 126 GLOBAL POP
A category of ethnomusicology, Global Pop explores musical traditions from a variety of nations with an emphasis on the popular music industry in each. This course examines the forces that enable the movement of music and musicians around the world and that give global music its persuasive power. Topics include music as expressive culture, music production, ethnicity and identity in pop music, music as symbol, cross-cultural collaborations in popular music, and music as a force that transcends sociological, political and national boundaries. For classes prior to 2020, this course satisfies the Core requirement in Art, Music & Theatre. For the class of 2020 and subsequent classes, this course fulfills the Core requirement for a fine art in Culture and Expression, and counts in the Core as a Global Awareness course. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Clemente

PSY 101 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY
In this introduction to psychology, students learn the language, methods, theoretical perspectives, and research of the discipline. This course introduces students to a range of topics within psychology, such as the biological and social bases of behavior, as well as basic principles of perception, learning, and motivation. This course counts as a social science in the Core Curriculum requirements. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Kuersten-Hogan

PSY 253 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a grounding in important principles of learning, such as conditioning, extinction, generalization, and discrimination. The behavioral approach of B.F. Skinner is predominant throughout the course, although the concepts of important learning theorists such as Thorndike, Tolman, and Hull are also presented. In addition, the philosophical underpinnings of a learning-based model of human behavior and the complex questions of freedom and determinism raised by modern behaviorism are addressed in the course. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Lionello-Denolf

PSY 290 PSYCHOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT: INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD
This course examines human growth and development during infancy and childhood. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between theory, research, and the application of knowledge in child development. Different theoretical perspectives (psychoanalytic, behavioral, cognitive-developmental); current research on selected topics (e.g., day care, cross-cultural differences in child rearing); and ways to encourage optimal growth in children at home, with friends, and at school are reviewed. This course counts as a social science in the Core Curriculum requirements. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Kalpidou

PSY 330 POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY: PSYCHOLOGY OF WELL-BEING
This course explores contemporary research in positive psychology, neuroscience, and psychology of religion on how spirituality (mindfulness, meditation, religion), and positive emotions, activities, and traits impact well-being. This course invites students to understand factors that allow an individual to thrive and lead a meaningful and fulfilling life. Students will read both science and non-science sources to understand the neuroscience that lends empirical validation to our understanding of what constitutes a “good life”. Students will also participate in experiential exercises to apply course concepts to their own lives, develop knowledge to live well, and contribute to their communities. This course helps students integrate knowledge across specializations in psychology (positive psychology, psychology of religion, neuroscience) as well as across disciplines (e.g., philosophy and theology). Students will be challenged to think about how the claims of faith can be integrated with and/or compared to science as they explore the complementarity of faith and reason. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Fitzpatrick

THE 151 FAITH AND REASON
Catholic theology both presupposes the compatibility of faith and reason and argues in defense of this compatibility. This course introduces students to Catholic theology’s traditional understanding of: 1) the nature of faith and reason; 2) their basic relation to each other; and 3) some of the various ways that theologians have historically approached the question of faith and reason. The course also introduces students to some contemporary debates involving the question of faith and reason. Each section of this course includes some readings taken from Augustine’s The City of God. Prerequisite: THE 100. This course fulfills the second theology requirement in the core curriculum program. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Klofft

Summer II (July 2 - August 10, 2010)

ACC 126 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II
A consideration of some of the more complex areas of financial accounting and an introduction to managerial accounting and its role in the planning and control of business operations. Changes in financial position, analysis of financial statements, cost accounting, and budgeting will be examined. The impact of accounting information on internal decision making will be emphasized. Prerequisite ACC125. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Coleman

ECO 111 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS
An analysis of the basic theory of aggregate economic activity and the application of the theory to current policy problems. Topics include national income accounting, the determinants of the level of income and employment, money and banking, fiscal and monetary policies, and economic growth and stability. Prerequisite: ECO 110. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: White

HRS 219 REHABILITATION STRATEGIES AND INTERVENTIONS
This course explores the full range of rehabilitation strategies and interventions that occur across the lifespan of individuals with disabilities. Educational and rehabilitation strategies aimed at maximizing independence for people with disabilities will be covered. Early intervention, inclusion and transition services will be examined as critical educational strategies aimed at minimizing the impact of disability and enhancing independence. The course will provide critical knowledge and skills related to employment and independent living options for people with disabilities including related legislation. Supportive strategies for assisting and maintaining individuals with disabilities in educational and employment settings will be addressed. Rehabilitation and assistive technology options will also be covered. Three Credits
INSTRUCTOR: Lauzon

MAT 114 ELEMENTARY FUNCTIONS
A survey of those topics in algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry which provide the background for the study of calculus. Topics to be covered include exponential and logarithmic functions, complex numbers and polynomial functions, trigonometry, plane analytic geometry, and systems of linear equations and inequalities. Not open to those who have completed MAT 117 or 131. Prerequisite: MAT 111 or departmental permission through placement. Counts in the Core Curriculum Requirements as Mathematics Group A. If only one Mathematics course is taken to fulfill the Core requirement in Mathematics, it must be at this level or higher. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Katcher

MAT 117 CALCULUS I
An introductory course in differential calculus. Topics to be covered include limits and continuity, the derivative and applications, and an introduction to integration. Not open to those who complete MAT 131. Prerequisite: MAT 114 or department permission through placement. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Kozak

MGT 342 SPORT MANAGEMENT
Sport has become a multibillion dollar industry, and as such, requires increasingly sophisticated and innovative management. This course introduces students to the business of sport. Students will learn the concepts, principles, and practices of managing sport organizations and sporting events as well as gaining an overview of the sport industry. This course builds on the skills and knowledge from an introductory management and organization course as students learn to apply organizational, management, and leadership principles to sport organizations. Students will also study change and innovation in both sport organizations as well as the sport industry. Prerequisite: MGT 100. Three Credits
INSTRUCTOR: O'Hara

MKT 310 ADVERTISING
This course is an in-depth treatment of all of the activities involved in presenting a non-personal, sponsor-identified message about a product, service, or organization to the consumer. Topics included are advertising campaign objective-setting, message creativity and development, optimal media mix selections, and advertising agency coordination. Prerequisite: MKT 101. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Drouart

MKT 326 MARKETING ON THE INTERNET
This course is designed to teach students how to integrate the Internet into marketing and business communication functions. The objective of this course is to increase students’ understanding of the complexity of marketing goods and services on the Internet. This will be accomplished through an analysis of the technology from a marketing/communication perspective. Students will study the concepts and business models of electronic commerce as these relate to the development and implementation of successful Internet strategies. Prerequisites: MKT 101. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Daniels

PHI 151 ETHICS AND THE GOOD LIFE
Each person must confront the question, How should I live? In doing so, one may also wonder, do the ends justify the means? Are intentions all that count? Is God the source of right and wrong? How important are my desires? Many things seem good that later prove to be evil or merely incomplete goods for the human being. This course uses classic texts to investigate common opinions about the human good in light of our need to distinguish apparent goods from true goods. Ultimately, what is it to live well? Texts include Aristotle’s Ethics and readings from the utilitarian and the Kantian traditions. Prerequisite: PHI 100. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Gallagher

PSY 101 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY
 In this introduction to psychology, students learn the language, methods, theoretical perspectives, and research of the discipline. This course introduces students to a range of topics within psychology, such as the biological and social bases of behavior, as well as basic principles of perception, learning, and motivation. This course counts as a social science in the Core Curriculum requirements. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Gordon

PSY 216 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
This course provides students with a detailed description and analysis of the forms of behavior seen as abnormal in our contemporary culture. Research relevant to and theoretical perspectives on these disorders are presented. Throughout the course students are asked to consider the implications of being labeled abnormal and to apply their knowledge to individual cases. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Volungis

PSY 281 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADOLESCENCE AND MATURITY
The course will examine a wide range of issues in adolescence, such as historical perspectives on adolescence; biological changes; cognitive development; parenting styles and family dynamics; moral development; drug abuse; and psychological disorders of adolescence. The issues will be illustrated and further developed through the use of several case studies. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Zhang

THE 100 INTRODUCTION TO THEOLOGY
This course introduces students to the intellectual challenge posed by the academic study of Catholic theology. Through the study of selected classic and 200 contemporary texts, the course familiarizes students with the nature, foundations, history, methods, and ends of Catholic theology. Students will become familiar with some of the distinctive movements and thinkers of the Catholic theological tradition, as well as the dialogue between Catholicism and other theological traditions. Each section of this course examines a book from the Old and a book from the New Testament, St. Augustine’s Confessions, the thought of a medieval and the thought of a modern Catholic theologian, and the thought of a non-Catholic theologian. Three credits
INSTRUCTOR: Monroe

ENG 220 APPROACHES TO READING AND INTERPRETATION
This writing emphasis course considers fundamental issues of textual interpretation, primarily but not exclusively in the print media. Representative readings, limited in number, will be chosen from a variety of genres and historical periods. In addition to adopting a critical vocabulary that will assist close reading of texts, the course also introduces the student to various interpretive strategies: formalist, historical, reader-response, structuralist, and deconstructionist, among others. Required for all English Majors. Prerequisite: Complete ENG 130 and any Introduction to Literature. 
INSTRUCTOR: Shields